La Ville Radieuse
       
     
 Installation view:  What Endures , 2016.      What Endures  investigates the gesture of dance as a symbol of persistence and resilience amidst the economic downturn and global social upheaval. The focal point of the exhibit,  Just Because We’re Magic Doesn’t Mean We Aren’t Real , consists of interlocking platforms upon which the artist’s works on paper are based. The wood sculpture was designed in conversation with the enduring architecture of the Coney Island Cyclone, a wooden roller coaster constructed in 1927, and still in operation today. The sculpture is both a stand-alone work, as well as an evolving and integral part of each separate performance and encounter to which it lends a physical scaffold. Breathtaking work from the series  Blind Sum  showcases Olujimi’s mastery of long exposure composition and print production. Olujimi’s photographs reflect the complex role of dance marathons as mass entertainment events during the Great Depression. These endurance contests often lasted weeks, providing much needed entertainment, purse money, and fame during an era of severe deprivation. With an eerie prescience to present day “reality shows,” these contests blurred the line between theatre and reality. A mix of the heroic and grotesque, of kitsch and desperation, these spectacles were meant to test the capacity of individual will. While the dance marathons challenged many gender and class expectations, they were vehemently racially segregated. Olujimi’s work examines the repercussions of such omissions in the creation of mythic space. It emblematizes the common contests of endurance, persistence, and defiance and the desire to live beyond the capacities that we have internalized.
       
     
 Detail:  I Knew You Before You Was Born , 2016. Wood, brass, glass walking canes, foot stool, faux pearls. 13' 7" x 5' x 1' 7"      Solastalgia  was an exhibition comprised of large-scale sculptures, serigraphs and paintings. The works in the show reside at the intersection of numerous issues of current concern to the artist: the state of his city and the nation including gentrification, police killings (both by the police and the killing of police), as well as the challenges of commemoration and loss.   The term solastalgia was coined by Australian philosopher, Glenn Albrecht in 2003. Essentially it is the feeling of homesickness when one is still home. “Solastalgia is when your endemic sense of place is being violated,” Albrecht describes. Though the term originally references the psychological displacement of farmers due to climate change, Olujimi employs it as a lens to examine the psychoterratica of the five boroughs as a result of a different kind of environmental change.   Oscillating between private and public, Olujimi grapples with the loss of his mentor and guardian angel, Catherine Arline, amidst the cacophony of actions and emotions that has marred the city’s law enforcement over the past year. Arline was a civil servant for the city and state of New York for over 40 years and continued to serve her community of Bedford Stuyvesant, Brooklyn after her retirement as the president and member of various councils and associations locally and throughout the city. Much of her later work attempted to bridge the divide between police and the communities they serve. Over the past year and half the world watched as a string of unfathomable events unfolded in New York City; the non-indictment decision in the Eric Garner killing, the shooting of Officers Liu and Ramos and the public display of disdain by law enforcement for the Mayor during the funerals of two their own, and the unprecedented police work stoppage. In addition to these and other recent events, the works of  Solastalgia  grow out of interviews Olujimi has conducted with current and retired member the NYPD, community leaders, Arline herself, and his own struggle to convey what words cannot.
       
     
  Night Vision , 2015. Video installation. Dimensions vary         How To Make Liar’s Pie , is a solo exhibition presented at The Pitch Project, in Milwaukee. It features six video installations that synthesize the conventions of everyday environments to complicate the liminal space between census and autobiography in the 21st century. The work gains inspiration from the proliferation of short form communication, such as the classic 30 second advertisement, Twitter’s 144 character limit, and Instagram’s 15 second video limit. The videos employ an autobiographical narrative and reveal the incongruities of social, historical, and cultural tropes through an atypical narrative structure. 
       
     
 Installation view:  What's Left to Burn,  2015.      What's Left to Burn?  features a series of serigraphs, a 25 foot sculpture comprised of interlocking platforms,  and a single channel video that was filmed on the sculpture at  The Bindery Projects . The exhibition has two rooms, one housing the video and the other housing the series of prints. Visitors most climb the sculpture to traverse between the two spaces. 
       
     
  Untitled  from the  Blind Sum  series, 2014. Giclée print. 24 x 36"      Blind Sum  is a collection of long exposure photographs inspired by dance marathons of the 1930s. These endurance contests would often last several weeks or even months. A mix of the heroic and grotesque, of kitsch and desperation, these spectacles were meant to challenge the capacity of the individual will. While the dance marathons challenged many gender and class expectations, they were vehemently racially segregated. This work examines the repercussions of such omissions in the creation of mythic space. Blind Sum emblematizes the common contests of endurance, persistence, and defiance and the desire to live beyond the capacities that we have internalized.
       
     
 Installation view:  In Your Absence The Skies Are All the Same , 2014. HD video with 4-channel sound, mirrors. 29 x 29 x 13'       In Your Absence the Skies Are All the Same  is a large-scale installation that consists of two channels of synchronized video, a mirrored wall, and four channels of audio. The visuals of In Your Absence are footage of 40 skies from cities around the world. The imagery is accompanied by quadraphonic sound featuring thirteen versions of the American classic, I'm Gonna Make You Love Me, reconfigured and remixed. Each element (the visual projections and the two separate audio tracks) varies in length and will phase throughout the course of the exhibition, offering viewers a unique and singular experience at each visit. In Your Absence investigates the cognitive dissonance of obsession, sappiness, erasure, kitsch, and the sublime in conventional notions of love.